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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Feinstein: When you look at what companies collect, the government does not seem to be a major offender at all. Gregory: But isn't the difference, of course, Chairman, that it's only the government that can deprive you of your liberty. You know, Google or Amazon, you still have to click to acquiesce and not even know they have a lot of that personal information. The government seems to want total awareness. And that's where even in the name of security a lot of critics say sorry, that is an invasion of privacy (and that is going overboard.)
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Gregory: Edward Snowden himself when he was interviewed in the
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Rogers: Well first of all, I couldn't disagree more. That's like having the janitor at a bank who figured out how to steal some money deciding matters of high finance. This was a thief who we believe had some help who stole information the vast majority had the nothing to do with privacy. Our army, navy, air force, marines have been incredibly harmed by the data that he has taken with him and we believe now is in the hands of nation states. Gregory: What help did he have? Who helped him do you think in is. Rogers: well, there were certain questions that we have to get answered. Where a, first of all if it was a privacy concern he had, he didn't look for information on the privacy side for americans. He was stealing information that had to do with how we operate overseas to collect information to keep Americans safe. That begs a question. Some of the things he did were beyond his technical capabilities. Raises more questions. How he arranged travel before he left.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Rogers: I believe there’s a reason he ended up in the hands, the loving arms of an FSB agent in Moscow. I don’t think that’s a coincidence. Gregory: You think the Russians helped Ed Snowden? Rogers: I believe there's questions to be answer there. I don't think it was a gee whiz luck event that he ended up in Moscow under the handling of the FSB. Gregory: That's a significant development. Rogers: I said we have questions we have to answer. But as somebody who used to do investigations, some of the things we're finding we would call clues that certainly would indicate to me that he had some help and he stole things that had nothing to do with privacy.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Gregory: Senator Feinstein, is there any chance that some of your colleagues who disagree with you will be successful in shutting down the program, the bulk collection of this metadata? Feinstein I don't believe so. The President has very clearly said that he wants to keep the capability. He wants to look for, other than the government, holding the material. So I think we would agree with him. I know a dominant majority, everybody virtually, except two or three on the senate intelligence committee, would agree with that. He wants to make some changes in the FISA court that you have to have the approval of the court before you query. That the amicus concept involving a panel would come into being. But the important thing to me is the President very clearly said, we need this capability to keep people safe.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Feinstein: Now let me say something about Mr. Snowden. I heard him on television say that he went there with the intent to scrape our systems. That he obtained a scrape tool and he began to scrape, over I believe a two-month period, as much as he could get ahold of. This isn't somebody who comes upon something and says, this isn't the right thing for the government to do. I want to go out and talk to people about it. He came there with the intent to take as much material down as he possibly could. Gregory: And do you agree with Chairman Rogers that he may have had help from the Russians? Feinstein: He may well have. We don’t know at this stage.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Gregory: Do you agree with Chairman Rogers that he may have had help from the Russians? Feinstein: He may well have. We don't know at this stage. But I think to glorify this act is really to set sort of a new -- a new level of dishonor. And this goes to where these data, this metadata goes because the NSA are professionals. They are limited in number to 22 who have access to the data. Two of them are supervisors. They are vetted. They are carefully supervised. The data goes anywhere else. How do you provide that level of supervision? Gregory: So is it critical then to get to the bottom and reinvestigate who might have been involved and whether there was any link to the Russians? Feinstein: Absolutely, absolutely. Rogers: Absolutely and that investigation is ongoing.
Barack Obama
President
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Obama: Given the unique power of the state, it is not enough for leaders to say trust us, we won't abuse the data we collect. For history has too many examples when that trust has been breached. Gregory: Good Sunday morning. So no matter what you think of Edward Snowden and his decision to spill secrets of how the government conducts domestic surveillance, he started one big debate. Without him and what he did, it is hard to imagine the President giving the speech he gave this week. Bottom line, the spying programs are here to stay it appears
Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for The New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: Mike Rogers is a former FBI agent, chairman of the house intelligence committee. For him to suggest that Snowden may have been an agent working for Russian Intelligence from the very beginning, he must have some inkling of evidence to back that up, I suspect? Mayer: yeah, that's why I think it's important -- this is someone with a very important title who's making these allegations. And he talked about clues, unspecified clues. I called his office to see if I could get him to explain a little bit more and he didn't want to discuss it. He wouldn't comment further. But what he is saying is not only denied by Snowden, it also is contradicted by several investigations, the FBI's been investigating and the NSA's been investigating, and the CIA has been investigating. They've all been looking for the possibility that Snowden's working with foreign governments and at the moment, none of them have found evidence.
Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for The New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: Were you surprised that Dianne Feinstein sort of said, I can't rule that out (Snowden may have been an agent working for Russian Intelligence from the very beginning)? She's the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Mayer: Yes. In some ways, though, when I called her office, they basically said she was just asking questions. They're not really saying she's standing by this. In some way, she was being polite and saying, who knows? It's interesting that they would float something so serious.
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